#DataSharing in #ecology – risks, rewards and expectations?

Remember taking a math test in, say sixth grade? There was that painful requirement that you show your work. If 2 + b = 7 and a – 5 = 10, what does a + b equal? Line up those little equations and hammer them out for the teacher, because she doesn’t care if you get the final answer, she wants to see how you got the answer.

Just like sixth grade all over again, the current generation of young ecologists* will have to deal with showing their work. Specifically, there is an abundance of data we are collecting and working with, much of which can be used for multiple purposes, from meta-analyses (See Christopher Lortie’s recent PeerJ pre-prints) to systematic reviews to reanalysis. Based on the era of big data, there is a considerable and ever-evolving discussion on how data should be shared, used and published within the ecological and larger research communities. . Some people find it to be an ethical issue, whether data is made publicly available. In the vein of elementary school math exams showing one’s work and data, various discussions have come up in the social media world lately:

A couple days ago, Brett Favaro documented a nice Twitter discussion on several individuals’ thoughts on whether data-sharing entitles a data collector, steward, or supplier to authorship: Continue reading

Shaken or stirred: what’s your method of choice?

Shaken or stirred?

WHAT: We are looking for early career ecologists to participate in a survey of statistical approaches. We will provide you with a small data set and we ask that you spend no more than a few hours analysing the data in any manner of your choosing. If you are interested, please reply to the address below and we will provide you with more information and the data promptly.

WHY: We are interested in the approach used by ecologists in the analysis of a standard ecological data  for a commentary on statistical methods. The results may be published in summary form, and no personal identification will be disclosed for any reason. Our results will also be posted to this blog when available.

PLEASE REPLY TO johnsg@uvm.edu by Wednesday May 29th.

The ecology of dams and dam removal: a socio-ecological history of the Elwha (Part 4)

I am pleased to introduce a guest piece by Peter Brewitt, PhD Candidate University of California Santa Cruz and blogger at http://damremoval.wordpress.com. In his PhD research, Peter is working on the politics and ecology of two of the dams mentioned in this series. Thanks to Peter for the quick turnaround on this article – please thank him by checking out his work at the above links.

-Nate and the ECE

The ecology of dams and dam removal: a socio-ecological history of the Elwha (Part 4)

By Peter Brewitt

The Elwha River used to be 45 miles long. It flowed north out of Washington’s Olympic Mountains, from glaciers to taiga to lowlands and into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It was far enough west to pick up the moisture rolling in off the Pacific ocean, far enough east to avoid getting scoured out like the rainforest rivers on the west side of the Olympic Peninsula. And… it was full of salmon. Continue reading

Soil Equality

Forest soil under lodegpole pine in Lyons, Colorado. Photo courtesy of Andrea Borkenhagen, 2013.

Forest soil under lodegpole pine in Lyons, Colorado. Photo courtesy of Andrea Borkenhagen, 2013.

By Kelly S. Ramirez, PhD

As a soil ecologist, I am inevitably asked about dirt (and lawn care), but mainly dirt. Depending on the person and my mood and the event, I may quip back, ‘dirt is under your fingernails.’* Some inquirer’s eyes will glaze over, realizing I was the wrong person to make small talk with at said event. Others will eye me apologetically.

Soil, not dirt, is the foundation of our terrestrial ecosystems, maintains our food sources, cleans and cycles our water, regulates climate change, controls disease, and supports our cultural activities and recreation (Wall and Nielsen, 2012). Continue reading

I’m Dreaming of a Green Christmas…

In the interests of treading (and blogging) a little lighter this week, a couple of ECE writers polled ourselves for eco-friendly holidays traditions to share. Think of these as a present to the planet, and who knows, maybe someday they won’t be “eco-friendly traditions” anymore, but just “traditions”!

** A lot of them also aren’t bad gift ideas for that impossible-to-shop-for person, and recession friendly as well. So happy last-minute hunting – and safe travels!

Vegetables: It's what's for (Christmas) dinner! Photo: K. Pete

Vegetables: It’s what’s for (Christmas) dinner! Photo by K. Pete

Eat lower on the food chain: (Lauren) “I married into a largely vegetarian family a few years ago, and thought the holidays might be a challenge. But not only is it pretty easy to come up with alternatives, it’s less expensive and also lightens the environmental account (see Bill Smith’s post on biofuel production)”

Buy local: (Lindsay) ”Already very popular in the enviro movement, keeping your dollars in your city limits is a great way to reduce your carbon footprint. Even if you are eventually spending some carbon to send the gift elsewhere, it still saves fossil fuels to have the gift originate in your home town instead of in a factory overseas. Many cities have websites advertising local businesses and locally-made products, you’ll be surprised what you can find! Adding a “from my home town” quality to your gift also makes it more special.”

(Recycled) brown paper packages tied up with string...Photo by Chiot's Run

(Recycled) brown paper packages tied up with string…Photo by Chiot’s Run

Wrap presents in alternative wrapping paper: (Lindsay) “Don’t you hate the pile of wrapping paper after present-opening has happened? Get creative this year to reduce all that paper waste! You could re-use saved paper from last year or wrap with a canvas tote bag that becomes part of the present. I’ve also been known to use brown paper grocery bags from the pile in our kitchen. You can turn them inside out, wrap, and then spice it up rubber stamps or something else festive!”

LED holiday lights: (Lindsay)These tend to be expensive, but they can save a ton of energy and money in your electric bill, too! I have some friends who are buying one new strand each year and slowly replacing all of their old, energy-sucking lights.”

Think outside of the box - or bin...for a grand gesture, how about a rain barrel? Photo by Elaine Faith.

Think outside of the box (or bin). For a grand gesture, how about a rain barrel? Photo by Elaine Faith.

Function over form: (Lauren)”My parents don’t need anything from me – really! But every Christmas I try and find them a new eco-friendly product that they might like to try and start using. It’s completely dorky, but I’ve actually introduced them to biodegradable dog waste bags and LED lights for their home.This year it’s a compost bin for their countertop…”

 

Give an experience (Kristen): “Want to give a present without adding to someone’s ever-growing pile of stuff? Give a service or an experience that they’ll cherish. How about tickets to a concert, movie passes, a nice dinner, a ski tune, or reservations for a weekend away? My all-time favorite gifts have been a massage, yoga passes, an annual state park pass that helped keep me outside all year long.”

Edible presents (Lindsay): “Think about gifting some tasty treats this year. These can be homemade or store bought creations that nourish and won’t eventually take up space in a landfill. There are a lot of small businesses that make delicious products with locally-grown produce, so you could even double up and combine “buy local” with “edible presents!” (Lauren) “In case you need ideas: local wine or chocolate are often easy to find.

Organic, fair-trade chocolate....'nuff said.

Organic, fair-trade chocolate….’nuff said.

And organic and fair-trade coffee and tea are easy ways to splurge a little for the person that you don’t know what to get.”

Forty years after “The Limits to Growth”: A focus on global food production

Satellite images by Earth Observatory (2006); composition by WK Smith (2012).

By Bill Smith

“Population, when unchecked, increases in a geometrical ratio.  Subsistence increases only in an arithmetical ratio.  A slight acquaintance with numbers will show the immensity of the first power in comparison of the second.” 

Thomas Robert Malthus, An Essay on the Principle of Population, (1798)

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the seminal book The Limits to Growth, which details the first, global-scale computer model (developed by researchers at MIT) to analyze the potential future outcomes of unchecked economic and population growth in a world of limited resources.  The main factors considered by the analysis included world population, industrialization, pollution, food production, and resource depletion.  The take-home conclusion of the analysis was simple: if we control growth and resource consumption, a “stabilized world” is achievable (Figure 1a); if growth and consumption continues unchecked, “overshoot and collapse” is the only system response (Figure 1b).  So how has humanity responded since the publication of this thought-provoking, anxiety-inducing analysis …

Continue reading

Early Career Ecologist Profile: Meet Nate Hough-Snee

The Arctic Ocean outside of Kaktoviak, AK, USA 2006.

I have always struggled to describe the rise of my interest in ecology or how I became an ecologist. At this point, asking me why and how I became an ecologist is kind of like asking a backcountry snowboarder why he or she is checking the weather every 30 minutes. Ecological research and restoration have become a part of my identity – it’s just what I wake up thinking about. Oddly though, I never really anticipated that things would turn out this way. Eventually, I ended up in the woods, on the river and out in the muskeg. To narrate this I’ll focus on a few anecdotes that, in hindsight, determined the R-squared of how I became an ecologist. Continue reading